Letters of Intent received in 2019

LoI 2021-2062
Binary and Multiple Stellar Systems and Exoplanets (Astro_Jordan-2021)

Date: 5 April 2021 to 8 April 2021
Location: The Regional Centre for Space Science and Technology Education for Western Asia-UN , Amman, Jordan
Contact: Ali Taani (ali82taani@gmail.com)
Coordinating division: Division G Stars and Stellar Physics
Other divisions: Division G Stars and Stellar Physics
Co-Chairs of SOC: Prof Hamid Al-Naimy (University of Sharjah)
Dr. Awni Khasawneh (The Regional Centre for Space Science and Technology Education for Western Asia-UN)
Prof.Mashhoor Al-Wardat (Al-Bayt University)
Dr. Ali Taani (Al Balqa Applied University)
Prof. Edward Guinan (Villanova University)
Co-Chairs of LOC: Dr. Awni Khasawneh (The Regional Centre for Space Science and Technology Education for Western Asia-UN)
Prof.Mashhoor Al-Wardat (Al-Bayt University)
Dr. Ali Taani (Al Balqa Applied University)
Dr. Ahmad AbuShattal (Al Hussian University)
Dr. Ibrahim Badawi (The Regional Centre for Space Science and Technology Education for Western Asia-UN)

 

Topics

1. Stellar and binary evolution
2. Formation and evolution of compact objects: black holes, white dwarfs and neutron stars
3. Evolutionary history of Galactic X-ray binaries
4. Evolution of triple and multiple stellar systems
5. Binary evolution in dense stellar systems
6. High performance computing in computational astrophysics
7. Phenomena related to binary evolution span scales .
8. The use of more approximate simulation tools
9. Formation and evolution of exoplanets looking in particular at how protoplanetary discs shape young planetary systems.
10. Planets around binary stars
11. Discovery and characterization of transiting exoplanets with the Next Generation Transit Survey
12. Exoplanet atmospheres characterization
13. Host-star properties: the active environment of the exoplanets. .
14. Numerical simulations exploring the dynamics of protoplanetary discs, and how planets form and evolve within them

 

Rationale

It is thought that about half of the stars in the sky are in multiple systems, consisting of two or more stars in orbit about the common centre of mass. In the massive stars, almost always found in pairs, evolve and end their lives as extreme-gravity compact objects - white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes. As a result, the binary stellar interactions drive many physical parameters such as, mass, orbital period, eccentricity, age….etc.
An additional level of research comes from the fact that every physical process invoked to the accretion disks. Actually, this issue continue to be an active area of astrophysical research, both theoretical and observational. One of the reasons for the continued interest in this phenomenon is the ubiquity of accretion disks, from protostars and protoplanetary disks to binary stars, gamma-ray bursts, and active galactic nuclei.
It is important also to discuss the detection and characterization of exoplanets based on the brightness variations of individual star. Since exoplanetary research is one of the most rapidly developing fields in modern science, with the discovery of thousands of worlds beyond the confines of our own Solar System. In addition, the dynamical stability of exoplanets around binary stars depending on the inclination. However, The complexity of the transits, eclipses, and occultations of even a single planet in a binary star system makes it difficult to recognize the transit signatures. In the future probably we observe more and more exoplanets around double stars.
By critically assessing binary stellar interactions and evolution, this multidisciplinary program will bring together theorists, computational astrophysicists, observers, and students for a period of 4 days. Our aim is to systematically connect the binary progenitors, formation and evolution through their physical parameters.