Letters of Intent received in 2019

LoI 2021-2103
GA symposium: Honoring Charlotte Moore Sitterly: Astronomical spectroscopy in the 21st century

Date: 1 August 2021 to 31 August 2021
Location: Busan, Korea, Rep of
Contact: David Soderblom (drs@stsci.edu)
Coordinating division: Division B Facilities, Technologies and Data Science
Other divisions: Division A Fundamental Astronomy
Division C Education, Outreach and Heritage
Division D High Energy Phenomena and Fundamental Physics
Division E Sun and Heliosphere
Division F Planetary Systems and Astrobiology
Division G Stars and Stellar Physics
Division H Interstellar Matter and Local Universe
Division J Galaxies and Cosmology
Co-Chairs of SOC: David Soderblom (STScI)
other IAU DPs (None)
Chair of LOC: n/a (None)

 

Topics

The state of laboratory data that underpins astronomical spectroscopy.

Advances in spectrographs of all kinds.

Advances in spectroscopic analysis techniques.

The legacy that our current progress is built on.

 

Rationale

Our knowledge of the grand cosmos depends primarily on the nanoscale quantum transitions of electrons within atoms and molecules. Our knowledge of those transitions, in turn, depends on laboratory-scale efforts, with a very special contribution from Charlotte Moore’s multiplet table. Dr. Moore’s work in the first half of the 20th century has been central to the successes of astronomical spectroscopy ever since. She started as a “computer” for Henry Norris Russell, discovered technetium in the Sun, and went on to the U.S. National Bureau of Standards, where she compiled the multiplet table and many other vital references. This IAU General Assembly would be in her honor.

The need for precise and accurate laboratory data has not diminished. Every time better spectrographs are built or new wavelength domains explored we find critical information missing that is needed for analyses.

This symposium would encompass nearly all the science themes that the IAU covers, from near to far in the universe, and at all wavelengths. The symposium would broadly include four areas:

o The state of laboratory data that underpins astronomical spectroscopy.

o Advances in spectrographs of all kinds.

o Advances in spectroscopic analysis techniques.

o The legacy that our current progress is built on.

The SOC listed at this point includes all the division presidents because this symposium is intended to cross the entire Union. The SOC will need some additional individuals with more specific expertise, and readers of this letter are encouraged to suggest such names to the e-mail address above.

It is anticipated that Division B would coordinate this symposium since their remit includes facilities, technologies, and data science.